Study Tip: Exercise

The first study involved a German college that split up three groups of students into light study without exercise, light study after exercise, and light study during mild exercise (easy pace on a treadmill). The study ended up concluding that the students who were exercising while learning did remarkably better than any of the other participants. The second study showed contrary results between two groups who were reading an in-depth chapter of a text book, one not exercising and one intensely exercising (elliptical). In this study, the intense exercise did nothing for the students immediately, although the next day recall p90X3 workouts was on par with the students who didnt exercise.
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Exercise Could Reduce Hospitalizations For COPD Patients

Cristobal Esteban said in a statement. “Indeed, even a low level of PA such as walking a minimum of two hours per week has been associated with decreased risk of hospitalization for exacerbated COPD.” The study, published in the journal Respirology , included 543 people with COPD; researchers calculated their physical activity levels by asking them how far they walked a day, for at least three days a week. They followed up with the participants at least two years later. Researchers found that those who maintained low physical activity levels had a higher rate of hospitalization.
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How Exercise Boosts Memory

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How could exercise, which engages your muscles and your heart, have a major impact on your brain? Well, if you think of the body as a highly integrated and coordinated machine, then when you exercise, the machine has to switch into major overdrive, expending much more energy than typical and producing much more force. Since it is your brain telling your muscles what to do, the cells in your brain start firing in unison and with higher frequency, producing strong electrical signals that are detectable even outside the brain. All this effort in the brain and in the muscles requires energy. And to keep your brain alert and energized, the brain tells your adrenal gland in your body to release a chemical known as adrenalin into the blood.
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